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Adventure stories of @sari_de and @ravitsunami

Budgeting a 6 Month Trip

Budgeting a 6 Month Trip

Tsunami Season is just around the corner. We're traveling around the world and this blog is our hub for all things Tsunami (food, stays, adventures, clothing and more).

The most common question we get asked is: how much?

How much money do you need to go traveling for six months?

We'll give you the numbers, but the long answer is, it depends.

It depends on what your compromises are. We could have gone a super cheap route, and done hostels and backpacker dorms. We could agree that we are not eating at nice restaurants, staying in nice places and doing nice things. Instead, we settled on our compromise.

We gave ourselves a daily budget of $100 each to cover accommodation and food. We are letting it average out, which means that in some countries we're going to exceed that budget because of the cost of living, while in others, we hope to come in under. Below shows on average, how much we are spending on accommodations for the first leg of the trip per person.

 

We also didn't want to forego any experiences we were really excited about. Safaris in Tanzania are expensive, there's no way around it. But it's a once in lifetime thing and we both really wanted to do it. Same with staying in a hotel in Jodphur that everyone raves about, or going to some of the more out of the way locations in Burma.

The other thing we considered was our personal stance. We are uncomfortable participating in travel that devastates local ecosystems or exploits local labor. The yoga retreat we chose in India is (relatively) more expensive than others in the area, but is focused on hiring and training locals, and on paying sustainable wages that are far higher than what you would expect in India. This seems like a fair trade-off for the higher prices they charge, and we are in the exceedingly privileged position of being able to pay for our perspective. We understand this isn't always the case, but we encourage you to at least consider these things as you plan your own adventures. On the flip side, we wouldn't do a super fancy houseboat in Kerala, with TV and a hot tub, because it has a terrible effect on the fragile local ecosystem. The simpler boats without electricity are not just cheaper, they are also eco friendly.

So, we know what you're thinking. This is all very lovely, but what are the numbers?

Well, for us, it's about 20K each. That leaves us a little wiggle room in case things go wrong. Always leave wiggle room. If you are so squeezed on budget you can't have a single thing go wrong, you're asking for trouble and you're going to be miserable. You have to be able to treat yourself when the going gets tough, pay for a nice hotel when you are devastatingly sick and need running water in the bathroom, go for a nice meal after a particularly rough day...you get the idea.

We also have a wildcard. Ravi T. is a consultant and amassed a ton of airline miles via work. This is funding our very nice international flights--yep, we know we're lucky AF.

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About Tsunami Season

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